Bringing science and development together through news and analysis

  • Developing nations speak up on climate change

Shares

Delegates from developing countries and small island states spoke up at the tenth Conference of Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP10), which opened in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on Monday (6 December). Tanzania's delegate said that for the world's 48 least developed countries, climate change is "more catastrophic than terrorism".

The delegates called on developed nations to fulfil their commitment to help developing nations mitigate climate change by providing funds and making technologies available. They expressed hope that a new era of international cooperation would begin soon, and called for increased measures to help them adapt to the effects of climate change.

Joke Waller-Hunter, executive secretary of the convention's secretariat, said there had been a 6.6 per cent reduction in emissions of greenhouse gases between 1990 and 2000. However, she said, this global figure disguised the fact that emissions from developing countries during that same period had increased by seven per cent. Also at COP10, the United States said it had no intention signing the Kyoto Protocol on climate change.

Link to full story on Inter Press Service News Agency

Link to related BBC Online news story

Read more about climate change and COP10 in SciDev.Net's climate change dossier

Republish
We encourage you to republish this article online and in print, it’s free under our creative commons attribution license, but please follow some simple guidelines:
  1. You have to credit our authors.
  2. You have to credit SciDev.Net — where possible include our logo with a link back to the original article.
  3. You can simply run the first few lines of the article and then add: “Read the full article on SciDev.Net” containing a link back to the original article.
  4. If you want to also take images published in this story you will need to confirm with the original source if you're licensed to use them.
  5. The easiest way to get the article on your site is to embed the code below.
For more information view our media page and republishing guidelines.