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The media has a duty to communicate science

Science communication is vitally important. After all, we live in the age of science and technology — could we imagine our lives without it?

Linking people and the world we live in is the role of the media. Why then does it abdicate its responsibility for science and technology communication?

The media gives priority to fashion, beauty, sports, political news and crime, while science and technology seems to have the lowest importance, if any.

The public suffers because of this distorted news coverage. Television and print media, especially, pander to the public's desires rather than trying to be educational. In India at least, by not challenging people's intellects, the visual media is turning many Indians into 'zombies'!

It seems that because science might not be what sells, the media — whose main aim is to maximise profits — does not bother with it.

Undoubtedly, science news should be communicated in simple language. Its technical complexity should not be used as an excuse for not publishing science stories. Science reporters, like other reporters, need to be trained, but science and technology training is given little attention.

If the media wants to serve at least as a responsible citizen (if not as the fourth pillar of democracy), it must overcome any hurdles to communicating science and technology.